quotes

Famous Aristotle Quotes


Famous Aristotle Quotes


Famous Aristotle QuotesHello friends!!As he sat and listen to his teacher he was a portrait of elegance and concentration he had a handsome face and grace for mannerism his eyes were small but sharp and cute.He was a man from prestigious family that he himself was wealthy.Socrates,Plato and Aristotle considered the famous for western philosophy.Socrates came first and started Plato and Plato started Aristotle in fact most of the records,teachings and philosophies in Socrates comes from  Plato.Aristotle was born around  384 B.C. in the ancient Greek kingdom  of Macedonia where his father was the royal doctor.Aristotle started his tutoring  to Alexander the great.Aristotle covered so many subjects like physics,Zoology,Biology,Metaphysics and ethics.Aristotle started a library in Lyceum and in that library he placed his teachings of hundreds of books.

So many people think that Aristotle was a pupil of Plato at that time Plato teachings  and philosophies influenced so many people and people called that era was a Platonism.After Plato death Aristotle of his own teachings and philosophies impressed so many people and he converted Platonism into  empiricism.Aristotle the meaning of his name is “the best purpose”.Aristotle shifted to Athens for education purpose and he joined in Plato’s academy.Aristotle introduced so many new subjects for the development of science and technology.

Aristotle says about sleep is when you sleep you will get dreams and in that dreams you cannot think and remember but when you wake up you can think and remember.Sleeping is good for health and it also a rest for the organs by sleeping you can strengthen your organs and stimulate your body.According to Aristotle memory is a ability to think about the past,present and future and memory can save inside image that is good or bad but depends on the inside image the outside image will be appear.And he says semi fluid  organ  will be there in the human body  that undergoes several changes in order to make a memory.     

Aristotle Quotes

Any one can get angry — that is easy — or give or spend money; but to do this to the right person, to the right extent, at the right time, with the right motive, and in the right way, that is not for every one, nor is it easy.

Democracy is when the indigent, and not the men of property, are the rulers.

Revolutions are not trifles; but spring from trifles.

For imitation is natural to man from his infancy. Man differs from other animals particularly in this, that he is imitative, and acquires his rudiments of knowledge in this way; besides, the delight in it is universal.

All proofs  rest  on premises.

Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior. Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions.

“A friend is a second self.”

The worst form of inequality is to make unequal things equal.

Whatsoever that be within us that feels, thinks, desires, and animates, is something celestial, divine, and consequently imperishable.   

Evil draws men together.

Famous Aristotle Quotes

If liberty and equality, as is thought by some, are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in the government to the utmost.

“He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.”

The whole is more than the sum of its parts.

As a rock on the seashore he standeth firm, and the dashing of the waves disturbeth him not. He raiseth his head like a tower on a hill, and the arrows of fortune drop at his feet. In the instant of danger, the courage of his heart sustaineth him; and the steadiness of his mind beareth him out.

It is easy to fly into a passion–anybody can do that–but to be angry with the right person and at the right time and with the right object and in the right way–that is not easy, and it is not everyone who can do it.

Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.

“Misfortune shows those who are not really friends.”

Wit is educated insolence.

In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels.

Freedom is obedience to self-formulated rules.

It is the nature of desire not to be satisfied, and most men live only for the gratification of it.

No great genius is without an admixture of madness.

The least initial deviation from the truth is multiplied later a thousandfold.

Men are swayed more by fear than by reverence.

Rhetoric is useful because truth and justice are in their nature stronger than their opposites; so that if decisions be made, not in conformity to the rule of propriety, it must have been that they have been got the better of through fault of the advocates themselves: and this is deserving reprehension.

A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they do less easily move against him, believing that he has the gods on his side.

Moral excellence comes about as a result of habit. We become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate acts, brave by doing brave acts.

Excellence Is Not Defined Through Repetition

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“Evidence from torture may be considered completely untrustworthy”

Business or toil is merely utilitarian. It is necessary, but does not enrich or ennoble a human life.

Wicked men obey from fear; good men, from love.

Good habits formed at youth make all the difference.

Famous Aristotle Quotes

“The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances.”

“Man is a goal seeking animal. His life only has meaning if he is reaching out and striving for his goals.” ~ Aristotle

The greatest injustices proceed from those who pursue excess, not by those who are driven by necessity.

Shame is an ornament of the young; a disgrace of the old.

Dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.

“I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is over self.”

“In making a speech one must study three points: first, the means of producing persuasion; second, the language; third the proper arrangement of the various parts of the speech.”

The body is most fully developed [at] from thirty to thirty-five years of age, the mind at about forty-nine.

Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.

Those that know, do. Those that understand, teach.

For imagining lies within our power whenever we wish . . . but in forming opinons we are not free . . .

“The moral virtues then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.”

“It is proper for the magnanimous person to ask for nothing, or hardly anything, but to help eagerly.”

He who is unable to live in a community, or who has no need to do so because he can take care of himself, must

be either a beast or a god.

“It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.”

It is better to rise from life as from a banquet — neither thirsty nor drunken.

“It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.”

“He is not prone to marvel or to remember evils, since it is proper to a magnanimous person not to nurse memories, especially not of evils, but to overlook then.”

“The most perfect political community is one in which the middle class is in control, and outnumbers both of the other classes.”

“To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.”

Any one can get angry — that is easy — or give or spend money; but to do this to the right person, to the right extent, at the right time, with the right motive, and in the right way, that is not for every one, nor is it easy.

Democracy is when the indigent, and not the men of property, are the rulers.

Revolutions are not trifles; but spring from trifles.

For imitation is natural to man from his infancy. Man differs from other animals particularly in this, that he is imitative, and acquires his rudiments of knowledge in this way; besides, the delight in it is universal.

All proofs rest on premises.

Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior. Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions.

“A friend is a second self.”

The worst form of inequality is to make unequal things equal.

Whatsoever that be within us that feels, thinks, desires, and animates, is something celestial, divine, and consequently imperishable.   

Evil draws men together.

Famous Aristotle Quotes

If liberty and equality, as is thought by some, are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in the government to the utmost.

“He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.”

The whole is more than the sum of its parts.

As a rock on the seashore he standeth firm, and the dashing of the waves disturbeth him not. He raiseth his head like a tower on a hill, and the arrows of fortune drop at his feet. In the instant of danger, the courage of his heart sustaineth him; and the steadiness of his mind beareth him out.

It is easy to fly into a passion–anybody can do that–but to be angry with the right person and at the right time and with the right object and in the right way–that is not easy, and it is not everyone who can do it.

Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.

“Misfortune shows those who are not really friends.”

Wit is educated insolence.

In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels.

Freedom is obedience to self-formulated rules.

It is the nature of desire not to be satisfied, and most men live only for the gratification of it.

No great genius is without an admixture of madness.

The least initial deviation from the truth is multiplied later a thousandfold.

Men are swayed more by fear than by reverence.

Rhetoric is useful because truth and justice are in their nature stronger than their opposites; so that if decisions be made, not in conformity to the rule of propriety, it must have been that they have been got the better of through fault of the advocates themselves: and this is deserving reprehension.

A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they do less easily move against him, believing that he has the gods on his side.

Moral excellence comes about as a result of habit. We become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate acts, brave by doing brave acts.

Excellence Is Not Defined Through Repetition

“Evidence from torture may be considered completely untrustworthy”

Business or toil is merely utilitarian. It is necessary, but does not enrich or ennoble a human life.

Wicked men obey from fear; good men, from love.

Good habits formed at youth make all the difference.

“The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances.”

“Man is a goal seeking animal. His life only has meaning if he is reaching out and striving for his goals.”

The greatest injustices proceed from those who pursue excess, not by those who are driven by necessity.

Shame is an ornament of the young; a disgrace of the old.

Dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.

“I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is over self.”

“In making a speech one must study three points: first, the means of producing persuasion; second, the language; third the proper arrangement of the various parts of the speech.”

The body is most fully developed [at] from thirty to thirty-five years of age, the mind at about forty-nine.

Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.

Those that know, do. Those that understand, teach.

For imagining lies within our power whenever we wish . . . but in forming opinons we are not free . . .

“The moral virtues then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.”

“It is proper for the magnanimous person to ask for nothing, or hardly anything, but to help eagerly.”

He who is unable to live in a community, or who has no need to do so because he can take care of himself, must be either a beast or a god.

“It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.”

It is better to rise from life as from a banquet — neither thirsty nor drunken.

“It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.”

“He is not prone to marvel or to remember evils, since it is proper to a magnanimous person not to nurse memories, especially not of evils, but to overlook then.”

“The most perfect political community is one in which the middle class is in control, and outnumbers both of the other classes.”

“To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.”

Character is that which reveals moral purpose, exposing the class of things a man chooses or avoids.

What it lies in our power to do, it lies in our power not to do.

A flatterer is a friend who is your inferior, or pretends to be so.

“The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.”

“The antidote for fifty enemies is one friend.”

I don’t like to lose.

All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.

“Democracy is when the indigent, and not the men of property, are the rulers.”

Those who educate children well are more to be honored than they who produce them; for these only gave them life, those the art of living well.

Take care of your body. Be as good to it as possible. Don’t worry about incidents. Look at me – there’s nothing of the Greek God about my physique. But I didn’t waste any time crying about the unpleasant aspects of my person. And remember that things are only as ugly as you believe they are.

Jealousy is both reasonable and belongs to reasonable men, while envy is base and belongs to the base, for the one makes himself get good things by jealousy, while the other does not allow his neighbour to have them through envy.

“Hope is a waking dream.”

Suffering becomes beautiful when anyone bears great calamities with cheerfulness, not through insensibility but through greatness of mind.

People forget quickly. Only a few weeks earlier they may have been on the verge of death. Then comes safety and the grumbles and complaints begin – over all sorts of trivialities.

The basis of a democratic state is liberty.

“Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.

The final cause, then, produces motion through being loved.

My relationships with American businessmen and with the Government have been a source of pride to me. Shortly after World War II, it was my good fortune to be able to prevent the shutting down of one of the finest American shipyards – the Bethlehem Yards at Sparrows Point – by placing with them an order for the construction of the first fleet of supertankers.

To the size of the state there is a limit, as there is to plants, animals and implements, for none of these retain their facility when they are too large.

“It is simplicity that makes the uneducated more effective than the educated when addressing popular audiences.”

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